This Month’s Books (February 2015)

B-Lines and Felines: The Month's Books

L.T. Suzuki – A Warrior’s Tale (2010)A Warrior's Tale

“Imago Chronicles: Book One, A Warrior’s Tale” begins at the height of the turmoil that shall determine if indeed there will be a Third Age of Peace. Besieged by the enemy from the east and now immersed in war with soldiers of the Dark Army from the west, Nayla Treeborn and her people are about to engage in the next great war that will decide the fate of all mankind and Elves in Imago. In a desperate attempt to deliver word to the Elf king of Wyndwood and those of the alliance for a call to arms, she is the last surviving messenger sent forth by her people. Now, trapped in a storm at the top of the world, she fights to survive the deadly elements in a strange land.Despised by Elves and shunned by mortals, she must now find the courage to make a place in this world, and the compassion to save those who keep her at arm’s length. This adventure recounts the defining moments in Nayla’s life that had forged her into a deadly warrior, a great captain and a legend amongst the people of Imago.

Verdict: 4/5

Humble NationHumble Nations – National Sick Day (2014)

IN ENGLAND, the life of a Human Resources officer suits Melissa just fine that is until a strange, unstamped letter – urging rebellion – arrives one Tuesday morning, setting the wheels in motion for a comedy of catastrophe and office-based high-drama. A deliciously-wicked story recounted in just less than 5000 words.

MAY CONTAIN: Adult Humour and traces of fish.
NOT SUITABLE FOR: Children, ichthyophobics, or those of a serious disposition.

Verdict: 3/5

William Shakespeare – Titus Andronicus (1589)Titus

Titus Andronicus is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, and possibly George Peele, believed to have been written between 1588 and 1593. It is thought to be Shakespeare’s first tragedy, and is often seen as his attempt to emulate the violent and bloody revenge plays of his contemporaries, which were extremely popular with audiences throughout the sixteenth century.

The play is set during the latter days of the Roman Empire and tells the fictional story of Titus, a general in the Roman army, who is engaged in a cycle of revenge with Tamora, Queen of the Goths. It is Shakespeare’s bloodiest and most violent work and traditionally was one of his least respected plays. Although it was extremely popular in its day, it fell out of favour during the Victorian era, primarily because of what was considered to be a distasteful use of graphic violence, but from around the middle of the twentieth century its reputation began to improve.

Verdict: 4/5

CaesarWilliam Shakespeare – Julius Caesar (1599)

In this striking tragedy of political conflict, Shakespeare turns to the ancient Roman world and to the famous assassination of Julius Caesar by his republican opponents. The play is one of tumultuous rivalry, of prophetic warnings—“Beware the ides of March”—and of moving public oratory—“Friends, Romans, countrymen!” Ironies abound and most of all for Brutus, whose fate it is to learn that his idealistic motives for joining the conspiracy against a would-be dictator are not enough to sustain the movement once Caesar is dead.

Verdict: 4/5

William Shakespeare – Hamlet (1603)Hamlet

Hamlet is the story of the Prince of Denmark who learns of the death of his father at the hands of his uncle, Claudius. Claudius murders Hamlet’s father, his own brother, to take the throne of Denmark and to marry Hamlet’s widowed mother. Hamlet is sunk into a state of great despair as a result of discovering the murder of his father and the infidelity of his mother. Hamlet is torn between his great sadness and his desire for the revenge of his father’s murder.

Verdict: 5/5

A Game of ThronesGeorge R.R. Martin – A Game of Thrones (1996)

Summers span decades. Winter can last a lifetime. And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.

As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand. His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must … and a dead enemy is a thing of beauty.

The old gods have no power in the south, Stark’s family is split and there is treachery at court. Worse, the vengeance-mad heir of the deposed Dragon King has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities. He claims the Iron Throne.

Verdict: 5/5

William Shakespeare – Troilus and Cressida (1602)Troilus and Cressida

Shakespeare’s tragic and comic dramatization of the Trojan War endures in one of his most intriguing plays. Shakespeare’s portrayal of the snares of young love set against a backdrop of a senseless and endless war can be fully appreciated for the beauty of its verse and the profundity of its themes.

 

Verdict: 3/5

The God of His FathersJack London – The God of His Fathers (1901)

As a young man in the summer of 1897, Jack London joined the Klondike gold rush. From that seminal experience emerged these gripping, inimitable wilderness tales, which have endured as some of London’s best and most defining work. With remarkable insight and unflinching realism, London describes the punishing adversity that awaited men in the brutal, frozen expanses of the Yukon, and the extreme tactics these adventurers and travelers adopted to survive.

Verdict: 3/5

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Dave Brown

I was born in Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England and have always been a bookworm and enjoyed creative writing at school. In 1999 I created the Elencheran Chronicles and have been writing ever since. My first novel, Fezariu's Epiphany, was published in May 2011. When not writing I'm a lover of films, games, books and blogging. I live in Barnsley, with my wife, Donna, and our six cats - Kain, Razz, Buggles, Charlie, Bilbo and Frodo.
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